If you want video to work, Lexy Romano of Phx Finds says be ready to work at your video. | Rise Grind Repeat 092

Overview:

Lexy Romano isn’t blinded by the spotlight. She’s been a stage performer most of her life, singing and dancing on stages around the world, performing off-Broadway in NYC and opening for Katy Perry and Tim McGraw. So you’d expect she’s at home on camera, too.

But when Lexy created her own online program in Phoenix, Phx Finds, even she was surprised at how much effort and time — especially time — it takes to do it right. Now, besides sharing what she finds in Phoenix, she offers coaching for people who want to get in front of the camera for their own business. Lexy Romano started Phx Finds from square 1. She has lots to teach.

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Rise Grind Repeat Podcast
powered by EIC Agency

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Hosted by Dustin Trout
Produced by Andrei Gardiola

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Check out the full video episode at:

Youtube Channel – https://bit.ly/3dlwjnJ
Spotify – https://spoti.fi/2Mgfpe6
Apple Podcasts – https://apple.co/2MiQdUv

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Check out the full video episode on YouTube at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BK5FsDgKHA&t=1184s

For more information visit our website at https://eic.agency/

We are also on Instagram @EveryImpressionCounts

If you liked this podcast, check out more at https://eic.agency/podcasts/

phx finds lexy romano

| Rise Grind Repeat 092 |

00:00

But I moved everything to online and I was doing all Zoom interviews for a while, like through the beginning couple months of COVID. And that worked really, really well because I got to work with people that I wouldn’t have otherwise met and I wouldn’t have otherwise gotten to chat with an interview and hear their stories.

00:25

On today’s episode of Rise, Grind, Repeat, we talked to Lexy Romano, from Phx Finds, talked about how she created a show highlighting Phoenix businesses. Does she want to learn more about the valley? Let’s dive right in. Lexy, thank you so much for joining us on another episode of Rise, Grind, Repeat. I’m excited because I know you’re out there helping businesses create a lot of content. And I know there’s a lot more to it than just that. Before we kind of get into that we’d love to. Who are you? What’s your background? What do you do? Yeah, absolutely.

00:54

Well, thank you so much for having me. This is so exciting. I’ve never talked into a green mic before. So this is very exciting for me. I’m so pumped. I’m so I was telling you a little while ago, I’m originally from California, born and raised Cali girl. And then I moved to New York City, lived there for many years. I’m also a singer and a performer. So that’s what I was doing there and got to travel all over. I was very, very blessed to get to do what I love. And then I came out here to Arizona about three years ago. And when I first moved here, I’ll be honest, I was a little bit like, Phoenix isn’t New York City. But as I kind of got to know the city a little bit more and started finding things I was like, Well, actually, wait a minute, Phoenix is kind of cool. Do other people know that Phoenix is so cool? And I had always wanted to do on camera stuff. And my husband actually came up with the idea for Phoenix mines. So we started producing episodes started getting it out there for people. And we’re lucky that people want to watch and people want to come on the show. So

01:55

we’re still here, what is the whole premise of Phx Finds?

01:58

So the premise of Phx Finds is kind of what I just said that I am the host. And I go out and find these awesome businesses, business owners, locations, events, whatever it may be. And I kind of talked to the owners, I experience it. And I take the viewer along with me. So they get to kind of see something or experience something as I’m experiencing it for the first time. No, I

02:21

love it. And how hard was it to I guess get it going? So it’s a brand new space brand new city, everything’s brand new. I mean, it’s tough to try and foster relationships, get conversations going. So I mean, what was it like to just go from idea to Alright, here’s the groundwork that we’re going to do to actually get this up and going?

02:36

Absolutely, well, you hit the nail on the head there, it was difficult at first to convince, you know, these successful business owners to let me come into their space and to talk with me and to trust me with telling their story. So it did take a little bit of kind of fostering relationships. And I don’t want to say twisting arms, but they twisted a couple arms, like Please let me come in and video with you. But no, slowly, as I’ve been in the space a little bit more, and I’ve gotten to know people I’ve just made made those connections and people have have wanted to trust me with telling their story. So it was difficult at first and it was kind of hard to step out of my comfort zone and start to get to know people and really put myself out there. But you know, it’s it’s it’s it’s been slow, but it’s it’s paid off? I think so. Yeah.

03:20

I mean, from my perspective, I think I found your page through Melissa

03:25

I love Melissa. She’s so awesome. Yeah,

03:29

she’s great. And from there, I mean, you’ve blown up in terms of followers, I’m seeing my friend share some of your content more and more. So I mean, as you say, it’s slow it on my perspective, it seems to be blowing up. I mean, how has that process been in terms of, you know, trying to figure it out picking up some steam? Has it been difficult to get to where you are now?

03:48

You know, I think nothing that’s good comes easily. And so definitely not being a native Phoenician you know, I do think people out here we’re like, you got to prove yourself. And it’s definitely taken a little bit of time to be out there be really genuine, I’m trying to be really genuine at least and show people that hey, I really like it here. And I really just want to show you cool places. It has taken a little bit of time I think to kind of get to that that point, get that trust, earn that trust from people. But yeah, just the the day in the day out the grind of doing the same thing over and over again and putting yourself out there. And it does it does garner some interest after time, but yeah, you just got to be patient with that. For sure. Patience is key. Oh, man. Yeah. So hard. But it’s but it is key, right? Yeah.

04:35

And when it comes to I mean, just helping create content, whether you’re selling the video to the business owner or getting sponsors to run it, I guess, what does that business model look like? I mean, getting a crew getting cameras all bad. I mean, it’s it’s it’s intensive in terms of capital and even getting a team together, whatever it may be. What does the whole business model look like?

04:54

Well, you basically set it I mean, we have a couple of sponsors. I’ll shout shout out. Dr. Matthew Harmon the Dental Center, he’s awesome. One of our main sponsors has been with us for a while he’s great. And then yeah, it is kind of a pay to play platform with our businesses who come on, because our videos are so highly produced. They’re really all about whatever it is that the business wants to highlight, and we go in, and we make a beautiful video for you, it’s content that you can use for a long time, it’s not a one off, you know, kind of like a quick news feed kind of a thing. It’s something that you can have for a long time you can use on your website you can use on your social media for a long time. So, so yeah, it’s kind of both and

05:33

yeah, no, I love it. And that’s the biggest thing. I mean, obviously, we help video from a marketing perspective, and it’s always want seems expensive, and all that. But it’s really, if you create something that’s lifeless, it’s how much revenue can be generated after 510 years. I mean, it’s easy sell video, three 510, whatever that is, it’s like you could generate three $400,000 in revenue. And seriously, it’s very ROI beneficial. And that being said, is as you’ve been working on more and more businesses, have you gotten feedback with, I didn’t even realize how this was gonna open up the door and bring people in. And I mean, what has been the feedback on some of these businesses that have moved forward with getting your videos? Yeah, well,

06:10

just to say something else about what you said, like get the ROI, I almost can’t even put a number on it. Because the ROI is, it could be limitless, like however long you want to use this video for, like the timelessness of it. And that’s that’s really kind of not something it’s kind of nebulous in that you could make so much off of this or just get so many views. But I do think the number one thing that I’ve heard from the businesses that I work with, is they, in turn, get hooked up with other businesses that I’ve worked with, yes, there’s a huge market out there for people who want to find these places, and they’re new to Phoenix, and they come to my page, or they watch the videos. And they say, oh, wow, this is so cool. I didn’t know we had this here. But a lot of times what’s great, and something I really love doing is hooking up business owners with other business owners. And that’s been something that’s been really cool that I’ve gotten to meet a lot of cool business owners. And if they’re looking for something, I can say, Oh, hey, I know somebody. So that’s kind of cool, too. Yeah,

07:06

no, that’s awesome. And one thing that we kind of feel sometimes is get a business owner that comes in, it’s tough to be on camera. I mean, yeah. How do you experienced that? And I guess, how do you help others? And I know you’ve recently launched something that that kind of coaches people on how to be better on camera, but we’d love to kind of kind of hear from your perspective, how do you kind of coach them? And I mean, what struggles Have you seen and what’s worked for business owners to get them comfortable?

07:31

For sure. That is a that is a real thing. I think everybody gets a little nervous. I mean, you and I literally just talked about like, it’s a real thing for anyone and everyone, if you have been on camera for years, if it’s your first time on camera, it’s a real thing. So I totally get it and built into coming on a Phx Finds episode, we naturally will do what you and I just did, and kind of talk about what we’re going to do look at this camera, don’t look at this camera, or, you know, just try to be comfortable. Try to be natural, which is so hard when you tell someone just be comfortable. What does that mean? Like? It’s kind of not not a real coaching thing. But yes, you did just say that I I’ve started something new recently, which is on camera coaching. So if you’re going to come on Phx Finds and do an episode and you want to meet beforehand, we’ll do an hour coaching before the episode or if you’re gonna just go on another, if you’re going to come here and do an every impression counts podcast, or if you’re going to go on on a TV show, or whatever it is, I’ll come out and work with you. I’ll bring my crew, we’ll get you in front of a camera, we’ll get you feeling more comfortable. So yet

08:32

we have that option now as well. That’s awesome. And it’s funny because it’s we always joke about it when Andre and I first connected took us probably seven, eight hours to even just get in front of a camera and say my name and the name of the business and its evolution. And to me it was there wasn’t one tip or anything I did better. I was just putting in the reps doing it a bit more. That being said, or do you see that there are actual tips or pieces of advice that you have that maybe someone can take now? Or is it just getting in the reps or a little bit of both?

09:03

Kind of kind of both? I do think you do have to get in front of a camera, you have to spend the time in front of the camera because there’s nothing you can do to just force comfort like that. People always say well just be natural that what does that mean? Just be comfortable, act comfortable. That’s that’s not really something that’s a that’s an actionable tip. But there are a few things that I always tell people, I don’t want to give too much away, as I say can’t give

09:27

away the secret sauce. That whenever they hear it, they’ll reach out there’s a

09:31

couple little things that that I always think of which you know, they sound so silly and stupid, but they really work. First one is smile. If you come on camera, even if you are really nervous, if you force yourself to smile, you’ll look more comfortable and you’ll slowly start to feel more comfortable. So just starting out with that smile. Another thing is keeping your hands open. Instead of sometimes when people get really nervous, they’ll do weird things where they keep their hands. They’ll clench their fists or they’ll touch their hair and they have you just kind Keep your hands open and down. Obviously right now we’re in front of a table. So it’s not as applicable. But when you’re standing or even if you are sitting, keeping your hands open and kind of in front of you, and then something I love to do, which, you know, if I’ve had too much Botox, I can’t do it. But moving your eyebrows, when you’re talking about stuff conveys, conveys that you truly mean something. So it’s it’s a natural thing that we perceive that we don’t even know when someone moves their eyebrows. You think, Oh, I trust them. Interesting. It’s it’s like a body language thing that I don’t know why that is why humans do that. But when someone moves their eyebrows when they’re telling you a story, or they’re talking about something it conveys, oh, they’re telling me the truth, I trust them. So those are a couple little tips. I won’t give away everything. But

10:42

Exactly. And I feel like it helps bring attention. I mean, even as you’re doing that, once you start moving eyebrows is like kind of focusing more, and it’s, but it’s those little things. I mean, it’s a little bit of getting in the reps. There’s those things, but I mean, even outside of making you feel comfortable with the psychological perspective, going back on the ROI thing, it’s like moving your eyebrows or your hand positions can literally make the difference in $20,000 in sales or 300. I mean, there’s so much that goes into it. Yes, it’s, it’s awesome. What you’re offering because video is only getting so much more important and more people are doing it. But I think people are cool. And with it, I mean, kind of starting anything. It’s always hard to really get the word out there. I mean, I always love hearing kind of how people started from, you know, just an idea to really grown it. How are you guys marketing yourselves?

11:27

Oh, man. That’s a great question. I would say I’m just trying to get out there as much as possible. I reached out to so many people. I think I reached out to you like a long time ago, like a minute ago. I think I was like, kind of the same thing. Yeah, I think if you scroll back through some of the some old dm I think I reached out to you a while back. But yeah, just really putting myself out there on social media doing podcast just connecting with people kind of the old school, the old school route

11:53

that what’s what’s what’s the biggest way that got a lot more people just saying yes. And connecting? Is it the DM route? Where you send in emails? Or I guess what are some of the tactics that have worked?

12:03

Oh, man, I’m so old school. I am all about social and I love like dming people, but if I can get somebody on the phone, or if we can meet in person, oh, man like that. I know, some people still aren’t comfortable to do in person. And I get that. But yeah, if I can get in the room with somebody or if I can get somebody on the phone. That’s my go to every time I feel like for a company like this where I’m about telling your story, I need to meet you and know you before we can do that. So getting in the room with somebody talking to someone on the phone so much more personal than just shooting someone a DM, you know, which I still do that as well. But

12:35

yeah, the DM leads to the in person conversation. Yeah, for sure. And with all that being said, I mean, you brought up a good point, you know, COVID some people don’t feel comfortable. Your entire business is being on camera being around people. I mean, how is COVID impacted just the overall business?

12:52

Well, it was huge when everything first started, I guess it was about a year ago. Now. I know it’s not houses, buddy. But I moved everything to online. And I was doing all zoom interviews for a while, like through the beginning couple months of COVID. And that worked really, really well because I got to work with people that I wouldn’t have otherwise met. And I wouldn’t have otherwise gotten to chat with an interview and hear their stories. So while that was really, really cool, and we still have that option, if someone’s not comfortable having me come out in person, what we’re doing now is we’re doing a lot of things where we’ll either meet outside, or if business owner isn’t comfortable having me in their space, we’ll chat outside, and then my videographer will go in with a mask and film, everything, whatever it is, however we can accommodate to make people comfortable. We want to do that. We want to still be able to tell stories while making people feel really comfortable.

13:44

That’s cool. I think that’s the one I guess appreciation that I have from the whole COVID thing is it’s forced people to really think of new business models have to get creative and how you do things. And I think for a while things were just complacent. I think things were just going to good. And I mean, it’s unfortunate, obviously that COVID happened, but it’s I love the innovation that’s come out. I mean, it’s it’s it’s insane. It.

14:05

I agree. Yeah, it’s definitely made people I feel a lot more creative. We’ve seen so many people come up with things that otherwise would never have happened, we wouldn’t have been forced into kind of doing things differently. And while I will say I, I’m excited that things are moving in such a positive direction. And that hopefully COVID will someday not be a thing anymore. And we’ll be able to be back in person with no masks and all that good stuff. But I do feel thankful for the way that it made me change up the way I was doing things and think differently about things. So that’s always good when something forces innovation. Exactly,

14:41

exactly. And that being said, I mean, it’s even even grown quick. Like I said, I see you blown up. But no matter how quickly people grow, there’s usually some type of hurdle, some type of just negative thing that can happen that makes you really should I keep doing this. Is this the right thing for me? Has that happened to you and I Guess if so how’d you overcome it?

15:02

Yeah, I would say it’s it’s happened a couple times here. I mean, there’s also just the day in day out of being a business owner. That’s, that’s hard. You know, that’s, I mean, shout out to anyone who does their own thing, entrepreneurs of any kind, it can be really tough. But I definitely had some struggles in the beginning. Starting out with finding people to work with that was really, really tough and finding someone that I trusted, especially when it comes to like the videography side, I didn’t know anything when I first started about that. And so that took me a little while and have worked with a couple people. And now I am working with someone who’s really, really awesome. And I think that also comes out to comes down to putting yourself out there. And just trusting that the people who stick around and who had the same vision as you and have the same like mission in their lives. Those are going to be the people who you align with and you’ll end up working with so so yeah, no,

15:57

love it. And before you kind of get into the hate kind of balance, time, work life and all that you’ve ever you bring up a good point, just the not fully understanding and having to figure that out. You have a great idea. I mean, I was in the same boat never touched a camera in my life. And it was just like, well, running ads. You know, my life, I know that creative is the variable to success, and you need video to know and so it’s it was a law, like I thought videos, two hours, and you’re done. And it’s just like, it was a huge eye opener.

16:24

Absolutely.

16:25

What were some of those eye opening I guess moments or things that just kind of made you take a step back and appreciate the the the work or art of of video?

16:33

Oh, man. Well, definitely the time that it takes our videos are short, they’re they’re only a couple minutes long. They’re between three and seven minutes. You’d think, okay, it’ll take three to seven minutes to make this No, it takes hours, oh my gosh, the amount of time that we that we book to be in the space to get the video and then on the back end the editing all that time. Like, wow, it’s it’s an incredible amount of work, like the time, the effort, the talent, that you have to have to be a phenomenal videographer, editor, all of that stuff that is such an art form. I have a huge respect for people who do that. And I do a little bit of videography now. But man, like the tiny little bit that I do now. It’s it still takes so long. And yeah, you really have to be an artist to do that stuff and do it well. But yeah, beyond that, it’s it’s just the whole creative content, mindset, coming up with new things. I also think that through COVID, I’ve seen people be so incredibly innovative and thoughtful and creative and the things that people are coming up with on tik tok, the things people are doing on Instagram, I just have to shout out to all the cool creatives in town especially we have some amazing people who are doing really, really great work. So keep it up guys.

17:53

You brought something I want to get it on the channels here in a second. But going kind of back to balancing work life, you mentioned, you know, I’d be looking for a home you have a husband and all that. I mean, how hard is it been trying to balance everything because it’s like, once you start picking up momentum, it’s tough to like, Oh, I’m just gonna take an hour from personal might take an hour from here and keep putting it in into the business because it’s the more time you put in there, the quicker it’s going to grow. It almost gets to where I mean, for me, it’s like it’s not addicting. But it’s it’s makes me want to keep doing more and pour more into it. Like I mentioned, have a three month old now.

18:25

Relations. Yes,

18:26

thank you. And it’s tough to balance at all, how do you balance everything,

18:31

it is tough, I I totally hear what you’re saying. And I find that struggle to be the same for me as well. I find that if I wake up in the morning, and I put in I’ll tell myself a certain amount of time, maybe it’s different every day. But if I say I’m going to put in two hours right away, I will get so much more work done in those two hours because I’ve allotted it for whatever it is if it’s editing, if it’s you know, making phone calls, doing emails, whatever it is, I’m going to put in these two hours and nothing is gonna distract distract me. And then I feel like okay, I got done everything that I needed to do now I don’t need to stress out about it. So it’s kind of a first thing in the morning for me like I have to get that work done. And then I kind of feel like my my day can run a little bit smoother. So it’s really about prioritizing whatever it is on that day. And and I do like having checklists and checking things off my list. That definitely is like a big. Okay, that feels great. Yes, it’s done. So it’s kind of that that mindset of like starting off the day. So it sounds like you’ve just done a bit more kind of instead of jumping into the day and just kind of doing what comes out to you. It’s taking a step back and planning a bit more kind of prioritizing, owning your own time rather than owning you and that’s something I still struggle with is is trying to plan out but is that kind of the transition to where it alleviated some of that stress you

19:48

kind of own the day a bit more than owning you

19:50

absolutely and you know, I think for for entrepreneurs or people who like work from home, I’ve never really worked from home before. I’ve never done anything like this before. So yeah, planning it. Maybe I’m sure I am in control of what I’m doing and not letting and not letting myself get distracted or turning on the TV and then you’re now my whole days ruined. But it definitely is about that planning and about taking control of that time for myself and and I struggle with it, it’s not easy. And I definitely find days that I just sat on the couch all day and watch Gilmore Girls and and then I have to be okay with that. And and let that be what it is. Try to do better the next day,

20:26

you know? Yeah. I couldn’t agree more. I mean, the the energy, the the mindset, I mean, seem very positive, very energetic and everything like that, I guess, does that play a role into how you’ve kind of grown the business? Because it’s something that I see is people that are more positive and energetic it’s get more things done, rather than come up with excuses. And that’s typically where you see a lot of entrepreneurs grow really quick. I mean, how big of I guess focusing on the mental side of things, the physical and everything like that? Is that a priority at all?

20:56

Yeah, it’s a huge priority. And I’m so glad you brought that up. That’s a huge, huge thing that in the last maybe couple of years, I’ve gotten more into visualization, and really setting goals for myself and picturing myself meeting those goals. And when you can do that you’re really setting your brain up to be prepared for when you hit those goals. And you’re already naturally creating pathways in your mind for how am I going to see opportunities now instead of downfalls? How am I going to see, you know, myself doing this thing I want to do rather than not doing it, you’re already training your brain to do things in a more productive way. So that’s been something I’ve, I’ve kind of tried to apply and whatever, I don’t know and whatever way I can, and it helps me for sure. Yeah, for sure. No, I

21:46

mean, I’m big on that as well. I’m I grew up playing baseball, and I was had a coach that was always just visualize it, it’s you can see yourself doing it, I think he just hit the nail on the head, it’s not a surprise, when you do it, you’re almost expecting it. And so it just it conditions your mind to I mean, if I’m gonna expect it, I know that I need to do XYZ in order to get there. And it’s just it creates that pathway. And I think that’s the biggest thing I’ve been seeing more and more get the video blueprint, the Google Ads blueprint, I think having a blueprint is what everyone wants. And that’s all that does is if you can outline them, see yourself getting there, it creates that blueprint that’s just easier to follow. Absolutely. And that roadmap, what was the I guess, turning point or event that happened a couple of years ago that made you kind of realize I need to focus on, you know, goals, visualization, the mental side of things a little more?

22:33

Well, you know, as a performer, that’s something that I I had never really done. Because, you know, I grew up singing and and I performed for many years, and I had never really done that I was just kind of thought, Well, if I put in the work, then I’ll be okay. But when I started combining, I read a book actually, I don’t know if she’s maybe not popular anymore. But Rachel Hollis is, I still like her, I still listen to her, I still think she’s great. And she’s big on visualization. So when I read that, and I started putting that into my my life as a performer, I’ve started seeing such positive results with Hey, this isn’t up to necessarily fate, I get to to put myself in a mindset and I get to choose how I approach this work. And you still have to put the work in. You can’t just visualize something and then it happens. Right, exactly. You’re totally right. Yes, you still have to put the work in. But once you have that clear picture in your mind, when the when you put the work in, you’re so set up for the opportunity to come that you don’t put any blocks for yourself in insecurities or or negative thoughts, whatever it may be, you’re ready and you go for it and you seize opportunities and you take chances and that’s how people get places. I think so

23:48

No, I couldn’t agree more. I mean, it’s amazing. Just I love psychology and just the mental side of things. I mean, it’s, it’s to your point, it’s there’s a little bit of faith and hope. But there’s also a little bit of you got to put in the work. And I think combining the two is just where people start to excel. By the way. I like Rachel Hollis started with my wife and the podcast, her and her husband, which I don’t think they’re married anymore. I

24:10

think they got divorced, which is why I think she’s like maybe not as cool as she used to be. But whatever. I still like her. I still find her stuff really helpful.

24:17

Yeah. Cool. I mean, kind of getting back to business and stuff like that. I mean, you’re big on on Instagram. At least that’s where I see vast majority of your content. Are there other channels that you’re on or testing out currently? Yeah,

24:30

I mean, I do Facebook as well. And I’m trying to do Tick Tock. How’s that going? It’s it is weird. Like it’s cool, but yeah, I haven’t I haven’t really figured out the how to how to do it and do it really well. So I yeah, I’m trying to throw some stuff out there but I’m just not as I don’t know.

24:50

I’m not as into it, I guess but I’ll get spurts and then I’ll start trying to do the editing and all that I’ll get like eight minutes and I’m like Nah,

24:59

I’m Man Yeah, right? series. Yeah, it’s gonna be a whole new like, you’re gonna be a Tiktok manager. Like instead of social media manager, it’ll be like you have a whole separate person just to do Tick Tock. But yeah, no, I so I do all those other things too. So you can find me there on on all the platforms. And then I challenge through Instagram. I just like Instagram. I just feel like you get to really connect with people. I don’t know. And maybe that’s just because I’m old. But I like Instagram and I. Yeah, I feel like I’ve made a lot of great connections through Instagram. For sure.

25:30

Yeah, no, I love it. We’re trying to test Yeah, tik tok a bit more just getting more aggressive on the different channels. What are we testing and and look at the results. But

25:39

we were post on Tick tock, what’s your like? What’s your like? Go to video that you do? One video. So what was your one nail

25:48

so what we’ve done is we’re trying to come up with a different theme each month on in this month. It’s like a tip from the department. So we had the department coming out with the tip paid automation and all that. And so each month is gonna be different where maybe next month, it’ll be a case study. So the first one was tips on how to create video that creates more engagement and stuff like that nice Andrea course we shouldn’t let them video department lead because now it’s set the bar really high and what it is gonna look like but it was given some tips and stuff like that. It’s amazing how much organic reach you have. Oh, yeah, on oh my gosh, yeah.

26:22

That’s insane. It’s actually like, I think it’s kind of similar with Instagram that the reals the reaches, like far beyond anything else, like story posts or anything like that. So yeah, it’s, it’s, it’s pretty cool.

26:33

And are you getting more aggressive on rails? That’s something we’re noticing as well. It’s like, I mean, either traditional post cool, whatever views but it’s like, as soon as you post on rails, it’s like 567 X the amount of views?

26:43

It is, yeah, no, Rails is great. I, I got really big into it, when it first came out. I’ve kind of fallen off the wagon a little bit. But yeah, Rails is awesome. I think, again, another really great opportunity for people to be really creative. And I love the the trends that go on all the hashtags that people are trending doing things. When people you know, steal other other sound bites and do that kind of stuff. It’s cool. It’s really fun. I think when you keep it positive, I like it. I like doing that stuff gets fun.

27:12

Cool. You know, you mentioned you’ve dabbled in video, you’re trying to learn it and everything like that. But you delegated trying to find a partner to to help. I’m big on delegate your weaknesses, the thing that you don’t like doing, has delegation played a part because I think that’s something that a lot of small business owners entrepreneurs struggle with, it’s, I need to do it all myself, I needed to be perfect, or whatever their hesitation is to kind of give that up or delegate. Was that it? Was that a struggle? Do you delegate quite a bit? Or what does that look like for you and your business? No, I

27:41

hear what you’re saying that it’s that it’s really hard. You know, because when this thing is like your baby, you want everything to be a certain way. And it’s hard to let those things go. So yeah, I definitely hear that. But I’ve been really lucky with the videographers that I’ve worked with, and especially the videographer who I’ve worked with for a long time. Now, his name is Christopher hunt. Man, he’s so good, that the level that he does, I could never even touch it. So I just know to like, let him do that. Because I, I don’t even really, like ever give him edits. Because this stuff that he throws my way. I’m like, yep, perfect, done. cut and paste done. Like, he’s so fantastic. So yeah, knowing your weaknesses, and then yeah, trusting that, that the other person could do it better than you anyways, I think that’s where delegation just really, really has to come in. And especially because I really don’t know that much about videography that I do trust him and i and i, and he’s, he’s helped me a lot with with learning the little bit that I do so so yeah, it’s, it’s hard, but when you know, they’re better than a little bit easier.

28:47

Yeah. Now you bring up a good point where it’s time to give him too many edits. Do you allow the people who do videos with a preview and give suggestions? Or is it not as my show you, you’re going to be on it and, and where I’m going with that is it’s, you know, you’re talking about time and how much time it takes to make these videos. As soon as you get client feedback. It’s like, Well, no, I don’t like that. Or, okay, let’s move it back to the and it just adds time. Yeah. Do you have to deal with that at all with the people you bring on, you know, if

29:14

there’s something that’s, that’s, that’s incorrect, if we misspelled something, or if there’s something like in the background, that’s, that’s you didn’t want in the shot? Or that’s there or something like that? Absolutely. We will do edits. But otherwise, we consider this like a work of art. And this is something that, you know, Chris has an amazing eye and he’s, he is an artist when it comes to all this stuff, like the videography and the editing and all that. So if someone came to me with with edits that that are something for their business. That’s incorrect. Absolutely, yes, done. But if it’s something like well, I just don’t particularly like this shot, then there’s probably no like I wouldn’t, I want to be accommodating as much as possible. But this this is something that we that we’ve fully produced and we look at as As your artistic work, so it’s all kind of depends. But we obviously want to be accommodating. So if there’s something that that is really necessary, absolutely, we’ll change it. Yeah.

30:09

Cool. I mean, it’s you’ve been working on a lot of businesses. I know. It’s so much fun working with every single one of them. You love every one of them. But what’s been I guess, the most exciting? I guess we’ll reframe it. What’s been the most exciting find here in Arizona rather than working? What was the most fun business to work with? What was the most exciting find that you found in Arizona?

30:28

Oh, man? Well, that’s a really good question. Like you said, I’ve been really lucky to work with so many cool places, great brands. It’s really great. But I have to say two places, like three of you. One of the very, very, very first run businesses that we ever worked with is lacuna Kava bar. And they are the only Kava bar in all of Arizona. And if you don’t know, Kava, it’s a tea made out of a root of a plant. And it’s, it’s Fijian, it’s from Fiji. And it kind of gives you like, it’s not alcoholic, it’s nothing like that. But it just kind of gives you like kind of a euphoric feeling. And we got to work with them and interview the owner Chase. And it’s, it’s really, really cool. And they just announced that they’re opening their second location up in Sedona. So they’re doing great, but that’s probably the coolest find. But one of the coolest places I think recently that I found is, so there’s a mobile flower truck in town. She’s brand new, she just started since COVID. It’s called Annie’s flower truck. And she drives around in parks at other businesses. And you can walk out and her truck is there. It’s in a vintage 1964 VW bus. That’s cool. And she has all of these beautiful wild flowers and you get to create your own bouquet. And she just like drives around town and pops up at places. So it’s like a mobile flower tracks. Cool.

31:54

Yeah, the goal to make it okay for either your husband, wife, whatever it may be someone else does it just get out of the office. Again, the craziness.

32:03

I think it’s just the goal is to create something beautiful that you get to handpick, it’s not like going to, you know, the grocery store and they have all those bouquets there already. You get to handpick it and make it exactly what you want it to be. And they’re all wild flowers. And they’re always different every time she goes out. So it’s cool. Like those are the kinds of things that I’ve been finding here in Phoenix that it’s like, wow, this is really, really unique and fun. So those are, those are some of my favorite places. That’s cool. And I mean,

32:28

Phx Finds Are you looking to expand to Arizona finds or kind of expand outside the valley at all?

32:35

I would love to so when I first moved here, I kind of I didn’t know too much about Arizona in general. So we call it Phx Finds because I was just kind of thought of Phoenix is like this big encompassing area. And I do think we do everything we do Scottsdale, we do Mesa, we would go anywhere. It’s not just the city of Phoenix. But yeah, I would love to do more things just in all of Arizona just in general. So maybe there’ll be a name change coming in the future? I don’t know.

33:02

Yeah, for sure. For sure.

33:04

Who is or what business or who have you been trying to reach out to that you would just absolutely love to get in contact with and highlight them that you just haven’t been able to get in front of them.

33:15

Oh, man. Hmm. And maybe by the time this is, you know, edited and out there, maybe this will have already already worked out. But I really there’s a new cool thing in town. And it’s this new trending thing of outdoor picnics. And these companies will create a picnic for you and bring it to wherever you are, or they’ll meet you in a park or they’ll meet you in your backyard or whatever it is. And they create this beautiful picnic for you. And people are using it for birthday parties for anniversaries to propose all kinds of different things. And I really, really want to feature and there’s a couple different businesses in town. I really want to feature a picnic. I just think that is such a cool innovative idea. Again, it came out of COVID such a great idea for people to be outside still be together but be safe and have like a beautiful picnic dinner or a meal whatever it is. So I really want to highlight one of one of those companies there’s several in the valley. There’s My Az Picnic, there’s Phoenix picnics, there’s several different different companies but that theme that concept is something that I really want to feature

34:22

it’s funny because I’ve been getting started I don’t know what brand it is but someone’s been hitting me with ads for that because I I feel like I’ve been seeing some picnics a lot lately it’s

34:30

blowing up that’s the thing right now that everybody is is is doing is talking about and it Yeah, man I want to I want to do I want to have one of those picnics. That sounds so cool. And so fun. So

34:41

yeah, so again, it’s it’s cool to see new business ideas, new business models, I mean, even restaurant shifting from in person to take out I mean, again, that’s just something I can appreciate and trying to try and find the positive and everything and it’s been so negative and i think that’s that’s the biggest thing that it’s really caused is just be real think a lot differently and it’s it’s really cool.

34:59

Yeah It’s definitely forced people to think outside the box for sure.

35:02

And knowing that you’re really big on goals, and really visualizing them. For you personally, and even the business, I guess, what are some really short term goals? I know it’s easy to talk about 10 year plan and all that. But I mean, what’s something actionable? Or what are you working on? And I guess the next three to six months that you want to accomplish both on the personal side and for the business?

35:23

Oh, that’s great. Um, so we went to cable TV this year, earlier this year, we started producing Phx Finds on Cox Channel Four here in the valley.

35:33

Yeah.

35:33

So we’ve been doing that since January. And right now we’re doing a monthly episode. So we produce we had January, February, March, I want to start doing it at least once a week. So I want to have an episode once a week, every week that we produce that goes to social media, YouTube, and then is aired on Cox Channel Four. So that’s a big goal, because it’s already just doing one episode per month is already like keeping crazy busy. So that’s the goal. I think, I think we’ll get there maybe not right away. But But that is the big goal for sure.

36:06

How did that how did that process work? Did? Were you reaching out to them? Or do they reach out to and go, Hey, we love what you’re doing. We’d love to, I guess feature your credit? Because I’ve seen I’ve seen a few other people that had some form of either podcast or show like what you’re doing and come on whether they’re featured for a month or two. But what’s that process like?

36:23

So yeah, I reached out to them. I was like, hey, I want to put this on on TV. I’ve been doing this now on on social media and YouTube. And I feel like I’ve I’ve, you know, done, done what I’ve wanted there and I want to take that next step to TV. And so I reached out to them and, and we made it happen. So it’s cool.

36:41

Yeah, it was it done for the business. I mean, that’s a lot of eyes. I mean, that’s a lot of eyeballs. Has it translated into more views, more subscribers, more overall awareness for you in the business?

36:50

Yeah, absolutely. Yes. Yes. And yes. Yeah. It’s been great. I mean, it’s also I think, given other businesses, the impetus to like really recognize that this is something that that they can use, obviously, video just in general, everybody needs video, man. It’s like blowing up, like you said, but also having that exposure on TV. It’s just so many more eyes and so many more people seeing that. So yeah, it’s it’s definitely translated into a lot more views. A lot more awareness, I think. And so yeah, it’s it’s been all positive. All really good.

37:24

Thanks. Cool. And as we as we kind of wrap up, this has been, it’s been awesome, love, love, where the business is going. I especially love that the goals and everything like that I’m just huge on the mental side of things and goal setting. I mean, it, it makes the world of difference in how you progress. But that being said, you know, most of the audience is small business owners, entrepreneurs. Most of them I would say probably know the value of video and everything like that. So for anyone that’s on the fence, I want to create something I don’t know how to do it, I guess, what would be the biggest piece of advice that you’d have for them?

37:56

Do you mean just in general for like creating their own videos at home? Yeah. Oh, man, just do it. Just do it. Like, it’s so hard to get started. For anything, any kind of business any form of of just starting something new, but man, just do it, just go for it. Especially with video. The best thing is that it’s not like you just went out and did something live and then if you mess it up, oh man, I messed up. You can take as many takes as you want. You redo it 50 times if you want until you get that perfect take, if you’re creating stuff at home, if you’re doing it on a beautiful computer or a beautiful camera, or you’re doing it on your iPhone, it doesn’t matter just do it, just get it done and get it out there and producing the content is is is more important than making it look perfect. Now,

38:43

I love it. I know so we’re kind of gonna have one more question. We’re big on perfect is the enemy of good and I mean just having strategy calls getting things to mark and everything I think a lot of people try to perfect the strategy before they get it out there whether it be the marketing doing the video, and you know, I’m big on just do it. Like obviously put some time and effort into thinking through it. But get it out there because more times than not what we see is that you know, what you originally thought isn’t what happens and you end up pivoting and maneuvering. Are you quick to to you know, come with an idea and get it out to market or do you sit and try and perfect it? It sounds like it’s the first but

39:23

it’s it’s probably the first it’s probably the latter. I don’t think I am a perfectionist, which can be good and can be bad because there have been times that I’ve then put stuff out and then like maybe I did that a second time because there’s a big old typo and or whatever it is. But man, I think I love what you just said that perfection is the enemy. Perfect is the enemy of good. Yeah,

39:43

yeah, man. Just do it. Get it out. If it’s not perfect, you can change it, you can redo it, but man just getting stuff out there I think is more important than if it’s perfect. And if it’s beautiful and if everybody’s gonna think it’s amazing. If you’re not Doing it if you’re not getting it out, no one’s gonna see it doesn’t matter. Just do something. Get it out there like, Yeah, I think that’s the most important thing for sure you can

40:08

delete or archive the post if you want. So yeah, and to me, I think it’s, it’s because if you’re going to be doing something, it’s going to be a process hopefully going to be doing long term. It’s not something you just gonna do it for a month. So it’s kind of cool to go back. I mean, we go I look back on some of the first podcasts and the first videos and just like, look how far we’ve come look at the learnings and how we’ve adjusted and how much better it’s gotten. It’s fun to look at the progress that you’ve made. And if you’re always trying to be perfect, and you get nothing out. There’s no progress or process or journey that that you can reflect back on and be proud of.

40:37

Absolutely. Yeah, no, I agree. 100% for sure.

40:39

Yeah. No, this has been great. I really appreciate you coming in. Thank you so much for your time today.

40:43

Thank you doesn’t thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it.


Where To Find Lexy Romano

LinkedIn: Lexy Romano

YouTube: Phx Finds Show

Website: www.phxfinds.org


On the previous episode of RGR, Dustin talked to Christine Ferris of True Food Kitchen about how her company pivoted during the pandemic while operating on a minimal budget.

Watch the episode here!

A Taste Of What We've Done