Diana Clyns up her act and learned to code after being burned | RGR 111

Overview:

After dropping out of college, Diana didn’t want to waste her smarts even at her most humble moments. As the sorted out cleaner in her neighborhood, she learned the struggles of trying to create rapport, always asking for referrals and negotiating her prices, etc. She also met other small cleaning providers especially in the Black and Hispanic communities and got to listen to their unique stories. That inspired her to create Clyn, an app that is specifically made for people like them and herself.

Her biggest reason, however, is to change the perception of how home service providers and janitorial jobs are looked upon. “We often see that cleaner or janitor in the shadows always cleaning up around the house or office spaces, but don’t hear of them,” she says. “Maybe an occasional “hello” or “Hola”, but we don’t realize how much effort they put to make sure our environment is clean and clear so we can focus on our daily tasks.

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Rise Grind Repeat Podcast
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Produced by Andrei Gardiola

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Diana Muturia; CLYN App
Diana Muturia; CLYN App

| Rise Grind Repeat 111 |

0:00

On today’s episode of Rise, Grind, Repeat, WE TALKED TO DIANA Clyn, reconnected and discussed how she taught herself coding in order to pull her business out from rock bottom. Let’s dive right in. Diana, thank you so much for joining on another episode of Rise, Grind, Repeat second time guests. And I’m pumped, because you’ve done so much since we first talked and even in the last month, you’ve had so much happen personally and with the business, but I love to love to kind of kind of hear what’s happened in the last two years, and they’ve had some ups and downs. I would love to love to hear the UPS, obviously, but also love to hear kind of the downs what you’ve learned from him. But

0:39
we were working with a contractor for the app, the I almost I think right after the last time that we spoke well, we met for the podcast, I think. And it didn’t work out very well. So it led me to be completely broke. And then the world shut down with a pandemic. And I was like, Okay, I think this is this is this is the signal that I need to just sit down and learn how to code. And so through the pandemic, I learned, just I just said, I’m going to pick something that’s associated with application that’s important, like critically important and learn about it. So I picked up JavaScript, JavaScript, and then I picked up Xamarin. And I built the first app, it’s it wasn’t really like a full app, it was something clunky, but it worked. And you did it. And I did it. I did it. And so I understood what it takes to get to where I was, and further. And it also helped me understand what kind of developers I needed. When I was talking to these contractors. I’m just like, okay, I trust you to do it. But I don’t know exactly what you’re saying. And there was always something that’s coming up. I’m like, What is going on? Yeah, so I was like, You know what, I’m just gonna do it by myself. So now I have an in house team of developers. We’ve built five apps so far. Wow.

2:10
Yeah. That is awesome. So September, even even kind of taking a step back to so what does that mean, when we last connected? You just met the developer? Remember, you were so pumped. And and yes, we’re about to go into development. Yeah. And so without getting too into the details, what happened?

2:29
Corn artists. They caught me. But I mean, I think we, you know, there’s some people who just, it’s like, let me say it this way. It’s like math, right? Everyone knows some kind of math. But everyone has a level of how much knowledge they know. If you say one plus one is two. Yeah, you know, math. Yeah. If I say four plus four is eight, okay, that’s another level, you know, math. But if I bring out an equation from numerical analysis and say, I want you to figure out how fast COVID is going to spread in this specific area in Tempe, then you’ll be like, I don’t know that map. Yeah. I don’t know what what is this squiggly thing? Right? So in that same level, there are people who are doing well. And there are people who are not doing well in that level. They think they know that what they’re doing, but they don’t. So I ended up working with someone who has got to that level, but they don’t know what they’re doing. Yeah, so everything that they’re saying makes sense to me. It’s like, okay, they, they seem to know what they’re doing. But they don’t know how to calculate it. They just know the, the, the quick words and the big words, while you and that’s really what happened. So it sounds like from a high level. Yeah,

3:59
we can in your app, which basically connects people with, you know, cleaners. Yeah, essentially. Yeah. And so really, it was, yeah, this is this is the vision. Yeah, it was. Yeah, I can do that. We can do this. Yeah. Throw in some buzzwords. Yeah. And then sweet. Let’s get going. Right, once you guys started going, and it was looking at mock ups looking at it just

4:20
just wasn’t connecting man. After the prototype. We were just being dragged along. We’ve been dragged along What’s going on? They’re not picking up their phone. A lot of gaslighting It was like, why is this happening? This is the fourth time in a row. So I was just like, No, I’ve had it.

4:42
Yeah. What does that do to you mentally? Because it’s you’ve worked so hard on the app. I mean, even when we were talking about You’re so passionate, you put blood sweat and tears. I mean, yeah, you’ve done so you’ve connected with people around the world people. You know, whenever you’re making the videos and stuff. I mean, people just saw what you were doing and donated their time and all that. So it’s You’re putting all this into building the app. You mentioned, this is the fourth developer now that Yeah, you haven’t been able to get it going. Yeah. At some point, most people would say, you know what, that’s a sign that this is not working. And but how did it like what was what was your mind frame, like going through that and then making the decision, you know what, I’m gonna stop trusting other people, I’m going to figure it out myself,

5:19
you know, where I come from, I came here with nothing. Yeah. And when I dropped out of college, it was like, I don’t have the papers to just walk into any institution and say, here’s my engineering degree, hire me, I can do the job. No one’s gonna say, you know, a doctor walks in with that their degree are gonna be like,

5:41
I want you to surgery,

5:42
even though you were in school all through until the very last semester, I don’t know. So I had to figure something out. And it was like, maybe just that grit of this has to work because I have nowhere else to go. And nothing else that’s going to I can say, here to my family and say, Okay, this is something that I have built that would help you and sustain you, plus the a lot of people who are believing in me, I’m not just going to call them and say, don’t say, No, it didn’t work out. So I got this job, and I’m going to continue living my life. I just it didn’t sound right. For me to do something like that. Yeah. Yeah.

6:26
I mean, I love I love what you’re saying. Because it’s, whenever you were trying to find a developer, it’s I didn’t really know what they were saying. You’re kind of leaning on them to know what it is they’re doing. Yeah, really, where I’m going with this is sometimes we’ll talk talk to business owners, they will be hard to do the marketing, but there is a level of you have to understand a little bit of marketing. Yes. Have a conversation. Yeah. Have you seen now that you’ve learned it that now you’re more mindful of what questions to ask? Yeah, it’s not just Alright. Well, I hired you to do it, go do it. Right. I mean, why?

6:58
That’s a great a great point. Because it’s like, every developer has their strengths. And if you don’t ask them what their strengths are, they’re very open with it. Yeah. If If and if they’re not open and honest with it, you will see it if you know what you’re you’re supposed to be looking at. So that’s a great, yeah, great analogy,

7:21
because I think just a lot of people get stuck in the pitfalls of Oh, I’ve heard them, they’re gonna do it. And then there’s the frustration when n isn’t what their vision was, like, right and know how to communicate? Yeah. And and so, I mean, what I see more times than not is that there isn’t the level of educating myself so I can have a better conversation after going through this process. Do you take a little bit of time learning and all that before you start trying to hire for the job that way, you can know what questions to ask, what was the mindful? Yep.

7:51
And even after you hire, you still have to ask questions. You still have to keep learning, you just don’t, you know, hire and then say, Okay, go ahead. You know, yeah, you gotta be like, okay, so they said something, I didn’t get it. I need to learn about that. Yeah. So you’re always on the same page, because the person in marketing is a lot more experienced than you are. So they may say something that’s totally basic basic for them. They say it every day. But for myself or other people that are coming to the marketer, they may not know exactly what it is. Oh, Facebook ads. Yeah, that’s what I want. Yep.

8:34
Yeah. And what happens is, yeah, that’s what I want. Okay, cool. What we said you said yes to so we get going, and then the month happens, and all of a sudden, the results or what happened isn’t aligned with what was expected. Expectations weren’t set. And now there’s the blame game. And it’s like, the marketing agency could have done a better job at not using a bunch of jargon. And, you know, you use it every day, but most people don’t. And there’s a communication aspect from service provider to the contract, or whatever it may be. Does this make sense? Do I get that right? Some education, right. Also, there’s the taking the initiative to learn as well, right to receive it. I don’t know what that acronym means or what this means. Let me go research it that way. 30 days down the road. We’re not getting Oh, I thought you meant this and this hat. It just creates a not so fun experience. If there’s a disconnect between

9:25
right the communication and read your contracts.

9:30
Just came up not too long ago, I had a lawyer and it’s amazing how many people don’t read contracts?

9:35
Don’t they don’t? Yeah, they don’t read the contract. And you were like, well, we agreed on this. Well, no. Well, it’s right here.

9:47
It’s right here sign right. Did you read it? Well, I signed it. Okay. All right.

9:55
Yeah, it happens all the time. I have a second business cleantech. analogies and we’re building apps and websites for for we’re really specifically helping minority communities. So last black Hispanic immigrant communities because I feel like they’re being left behind with technology. And I want to see how we can help them earn money in the booming technology market. Oh, yeah. So even though that’s a great cause, not everyone understands that. Yeah. And just recently, I was like, Okay, I’m so passionate just started the work. And then it just became chaos. Like, Oh, no, I wish I signed a contract. This even though this is like, pretty much just helping out, this is not how I wanted it to go. So yeah, contracts are important.

10:49
Very much. So. Yeah. I mean, it’s so I mean, you know, you had had your app going developer kinda bailed wasn’t, you know, a right fit you then head down? I’m gonna learn this myself. You start building the pandemic happens? Yes. What has all happened this last year? I mean, since you started learning, where’s the app come? We’d love to kind of hear the journey through the pandemic, and how you How long did that take?

11:15
We started in September. And then we had the MVP around, I would say March. And then we realized, okay, we need to polish a few things. And then we finished it, maybe like, July? June, around June.

11:32
Okay. Nice. So yeah. So did you build the whole app? Or did you get to where, hey, I’ve learned enough, let’s bring on some help. I at least now know how to manage a developer? Yes, yes. So what is that all been like going from? I’ve been burned, too. I learned it. Now. Let’s bring in more helping because I think a lot of people would be I am not bringing any help I I’m doing this myself. But then it’s tough to scale because you’re limited by time. So how, what is that process like going from being burned to trying to trust people again?

12:02
First, it felt fantastic. It’s like my mind grew, it really felt like I was on another level. Even when talking to other people who are investing their time, not necessarily money, and they’re in the tech world, we would have fantastic conversations in there. Like, okay, we know, she knows what she’s doing. Yeah, most of the time in startups. If you’re a tech startup, you have to have someone technical, to be a co founder. And so having when people talk to me, and they’re like, you were a cleaner, and now you’re technical. You’re doing both. Okay, we got something here. Yeah. But before it was just like, Oh, great. Do you have a technical co founder? No, we’re doing contracting? Okay, let me know when it’s done. You know, so.

12:55
And what do you do? It is because it’s like, I mean, I understand you understand the tech a little bit more now. Is a DVM because you can make better business decisions now or? Because I mean, do you really think that there is that big of a difference? Whether you have the tech background? Or you didn’t, you knew there was a problem had a solution? Like, do you see that now, you know, a bit more on the tech side that your ideas that much more valuable? You know what I mean,

13:17
some investors don’t care, gotcha. They don’t care, as long as you have a solid technical team. But to get a solid technical team, you have to have someone who has enough authority to who’s technical as well. And I see it now because when I talk to investors, they, we, we, it’s like a conversation, we just have a solid good conversation. And they know exactly where we are. But before it was just like, yeah, we’re gonna finish the app, and then we’re gonna market but I’m not talking about Yeah, we now have a beta. The beta is, is, is in Google Play and Apple Store. We’re testing it out, we’re doing some technical testing. This is a feature we’re going to add this is a language that we’re using, and we got some credit from Microsoft because of the language we’re using. So the way I talk to them they have a very clear picture of where we are and that’s very important for anyone who’d like to invest time or money in it Well, I

14:17
think also knowing print invest money into something I mean, it’s easier to hand money over whenever you have that this is where we’re at in the next two months. We’re rolling this out this is how we’re gonna survey you have a plan of attack on how you’re gonna make your product better yeah job someone’s gonna bring them a return but if it’s what we’re building the app and I’m gonna market it like I don’t I don’t know if you understand it enough, right give you my money. Yes. And me to make a return on my investment. So always

14:41
expect to challenge so if you’re like, you know, everything seems Kumbaya, they kind of like something here. Yeah, you’re either hiding something or you don’t know what’s being Yeah, what’s coming. So I’m just letting them know like, Okay, so here’s where we are. The issue We’re having right now is I’m just going to give an example. An example actually happened was subscription. So Apple and Google said, if you’re pushing any content and you’re selling content through your app, you’ll have a 15% fee of everything that’s going through the app. Lovely. Yeah. Yeah. All right. Um, and also the language we’re using, they didn’t have a solution for it. So we had to figure that out. Oh, man.

15:29
Yeah, they’re like, two siblings that are always just fighting. And we’re in the middle like, Guys, we need to keep moving forward. So yeah, I’ve seen more and more people now decide to come out with one app over the other because of because of that, it’s, I mean, it’s almost like two completely separate projects from Apple to Android towards like 90 to double down on resources, the talent cost twice as much to come out on bowl. So it’s like, what’s the app that we come out with? Is that Apple first, then we get that out there, get some revenue coming in, and then fund the Android build? What does that look like for you?

16:08
That wasn’t such a big problem for us, because we’re using Xamarin. So Xamarin is like, for example, Apple and Android and everything, that they share every code that they share it and it would work fine. That’s what Xamarin is. Gotcha. So

16:23
you connected between the two language translator between the two languages?

16:27
Exactly. So it’s, it’s just you create one app, and it will work just fine in Android, and just fine in Apple or iOS. But there are some tweaks that you have to do. It’s not just like, copy. Yeah, it does seem a lot of time.

16:44
Gotcha. Yeah. So from the app, I mean, you brought people on, it sounds like you’re talking to investor, what’s the current state? And what is the roadmap look like maybe in the next couple of months?

16:54
So we’ve already know first outside investor, congrats. And a lot of the people that who have been helping me like Francine, I don’t know if you know, for instance, I go away. She’s like, she was at your place a while back. Whenever we Oh, no, she, she’s a fairy godmother of funding in startups. A gotcha news, Ana.

17:18
Good. Okay. So yeah, don’t

17:21
just fly somewhere new, we’re successful.

17:26
That’s a good person to be around. Yes.

17:29
And people like her saying, I think you were ready for funding everything. You’re ready for funding. So we’re just getting started.

17:36
Cool. And one of those conversations like I mean, that’s so many technology companies just try and build something to get to even that level of conversation. I mean, you’ve been through so much. I mean, what is it like? And how does it feel to finally be at that part where not only you think you’re ready for it, but someone from the outside that isn’t investing says you’re ready for it.

17:56
It’s great. It’s like, wearing your scars so proudly, and they can see that. I think they absolutely love knowing that you’ve tried and tried and you haven’t given up, it shows consistency, compared to like a new company. Unless you have something that’s absolutely groundbreaking, like new technology, it’s very hard to just say I built this and we started this company three months ago, we built this and give us funding. There are a lot of people doing that. So

18:30
yeah, cool. So I mean, what does the future look like? I mean, is is you close to having funding come through? And I guess what are you looking to do once the funding comes in? Are you working on expanding features? Are you trying to get more activation? What what what does that look like?

18:47
A few things. So the first one is marketing. So we have runway to do marketing this this year. And then the second part is training cleaners. So something that we’ve noticed is cleaners all they all have some kind of standard, it’s not the same. So we’ve started training cleaners. And then we’ve also started equipping houses and cleaners. One thing that other competitors are doing is that they they fully equipped the cleaners with the broom and everything. But even though your house looks clean, it’s not really clean. you’re transferring fungi, germs from one house to another. It just smells good. Gotcha. So instead of doing that we’re equipping the home instead of the cleaner. So the

19:34
interesting so so yeah, okay, so then there’s less inventory the cleaners have to hold. Yes. And then that time that’s, that’s smart. There’s no one else really run with that model. No, I

19:45
know, I’ve not seen anyone run with that model. They always want to have their own equipment because not all houses have the same equipment. And so they were like, okay, we’ll just buy our own, but it’s not really the most hygiene Way to go. Yeah. Honestly, the way I came up with this is I was on the light rail, getting out of a cleaning client and cleaning for clients. Yeah. And there was another cleaner in the light rail with a bucket and a mop. And I was like, that is so nasty. Yeah, like when you really think about it. Yeah. And for him to carry a mob and a broom everywhere in the bus in the light rail. Man.

20:27
They must be cumbersome. And that’s probably all that he has. And is he the one that typically has to pay for that or buy their supplies or they buy their own supplies? And so are you buying the supplies for the home? Yes, so I mean, not only are you making it less expensive for a cleaner to come on and work with you because they don’t have to buy their own stuff but now you can promote the hygiene the cleanliness, which that’s what people are hiring cleaners for. Yes, you want clean they don’t want to mask Yeah, I can go take air freshener and spray it right and it smells good. But ultimately, it’s not clean and so

20:59
Exactly. Man, we can go in a rabbit hole for that. So I’m gonna relax

21:10
that’s a very unique differentiation one bring on talent and to to bring on more business and that’s a good combination. Whenever you have a big differentiator. Yeah. Hey, mister missus cleaner. You don’t have your own stuff. You don’t have to haul it around with you. Right? How many you know have used public transportation versus have their own and a lot to haul. So making the cleaners life much better. You’re making you know, the the homeowners life much cleaner. I’d love to hear more in the rabbit hole.

21:40
Have you have you read this book called The 1%? I haven’t read it. But I have heard heard about it, you have to read it. Okay, you have to read it. So I just look at improving 1% in everything, everything that’s going around all the gears and whatever that’s moving around, is just improved by 1%. So how can I improve? The how great the application works? I want to set? How can I improve? How the cleaner works by 1%? How can I improve how the client connects with a cleaner by 1%? Like I always look at how can I improve everything? Just 1%. And it makes a huge difference. Yeah. So for cleaners, I saw another company. They just gave the cleaners like a shirt. And I’m like, okay, you’re just trying to market yourself, dude. That’s not really equipping them. So we were like, okay, let’s get face covers that are clear. Let’s get face masks. Let’s get hand gloves. Let’s get gloves for the house. So they’re temporary gloves that they wear. And then they’re cleaning gloves that are in the house. Let’s get shoe covers. Let’s get clothes that are water resistant. Wow. You know, small things like that make a huge difference.

22:59
And it doesn’t increase the overhead a ton to where now you’re priced out of the market. You know, I mean, it’s again, if you can get a tour, you’re providing that maybe a little bit on the margin, but now you have so much that you can go to market with Yeah, attract great talent, right? attract high paying customers, because that’s you’re bringing value that that’s why someone wants to invest anyway, is that that’s amazing. What, how long is it been to kind of come up with this model? When did the Epiphany happen?

23:28
I think it’s in waves. Because sometimes, like we would just completely be in a cave and like, Okay, we got to get this done. And he shut the world out. Yeah. And then when you walk out, you’re like, wait a minute, there’s a lot more that we need to improve on. Yeah. So I still clean houses. I still go and say, Hey, Chelsea, one of my clients. Yeah. Can I come clean your house? So I can test this out? She’s like, Sure, no problem. Yeah. And it just helps me just still be in that cleaners mindset to understand what the cleaners are going through. Most of the companies their their executives don’t clean, they never cleaned. So they don’t know what the cleaners need. And if they bring them and say okay, guys, what do you guys need? Everyone’s gonna be like, a lot. Yeah, you know, so just being able to do it myself. Just anytime that I can, at least once a month helps me understand. Okay, whoa, we can improve on this part. Yeah, yeah.

24:30
Absolutely. Love it. I mean, you you’re doing all the right things, getting in the employee issues, getting in the consumer shoes, finding the problems. What can we do to solve these problems now? not change the world overnight, but how can make them a little bit better incrementally right day, over the course of a year, we’re gonna have a much better product, much happier customers, much happier employees. Yeah, ultimately, it’s gonna impact a lot more people in a positive way. Yes, for sure. How do you go about the one I’ve heard that that improve 1% each day and I’m big on data and all that and quantifying it. So is it just A matter of let’s let’s map out all the different parts of my life. And what’s the one thing I can make better? Like, how do you quantify that, that 1% or check the box to know that I am improving x, y, z 1% every day, you know what I mean?

25:14
I would say how I feel about it when it’s done, and also customers, what the customers are saying, how fast the work is being done. You know, sometimes you may have a new customer, they don’t know that you’ve started from the trenches. So when you do something, it’s like, they really just expect it. And that’s great for sure. But reaching out to all customers and saying, Hey, can we come over and do this, we’ve improved a few things. We want to see how it works. And we would love for you to just, you know, give us a chance. And just getting that feedback is fantastic. Because they’re like, oh, wow, they finished in you know, four hours instead of five or the house is so much cleaner. I love it. Small things like that just make a huge difference.

26:01
Have you always just grown up asking why all the time? It seems like, Okay, why is that not working? Why How? Yeah, that like, it seems like he’s just no matter what, it didn’t matter how good it is. Why? Why is it? Good? Well, how can we make it better? You know what I’m Yeah.

26:14
Yes. I’m very curious. I’m very curious. I think curiosity is like, a great talent or skill to have So, so great, because you will not be afraid of anything. Really, you will not be afraid of anything. Not to get into like, deep stuff that much. But I feel like when, when I came to the US, a lot of people lead with fear. Because that’s all that they’ve been fed in the news. Whatever it is, like, when I got here, it was weird for someone be like, Whoa,

26:54
yeah.

26:55
What’s your accent? Ah, we got to get out of here. You know what I mean? But for me, I was just curious. I’m like, your accent is different from the person that I met in Texas. Where are you from? Yeah, you know, I just want to know where they are from? who they are. It it builds friendships, it builds relationships, and you just live a less stressful life. Yeah, yeah.

27:17
I couldn’t agree more. I mean, it’s one thing that I will will say, though, is it’s tough to being too curious. It’s almost like your mind can go too far. So how do you figure out? There’s a lot of curiosity that can move the business 2% that can the business 90% you identify what curiosity to run after and what Alright, mind, just keep that in the back of the mind. Right? A little more curious. Three months down the road, you know what I mean? How do you prioritize where, where you’re going and how you spend your time?

27:45
If I think about it, I would say how easy it is to implement it. That’s the first one. And the second one is three things, how important it is, how urgent it is, or is it important and urgent? So if I’m curious and say, okay, you know, I don’t know, I let’s talk we were talking about glasses. Yeah. And I’m like, Okay, so I’m coming to this podcast. I need green glasses. Is that really important in our budget? No, it’s not. But I’m like, Okay, well actually look great on camera, and people are gonna be like, wow, everything is matching. How would they do that? But it’s not urgent. Yeah. What would be more urgent is, maybe I should pick out the right. clothes that I already have to wear to come here. Something that’s not contrasting or Yeah, you know, that looks like it’s floating around something like that. Yeah. So it’s like, Okay, if it’s not urgent and important, it’s the very last thing. Yeah, yeah.

28:49
I mean, it’s basically taking a step back. And here’s all the things and just from a scale of one to 10, how urgent how important, how timely does this need to get done? And right, just think it’s a matter of just taking a step back and looking at it, right?

29:01
On a business side of it, I would say, cost cost of implementing it time. That’s very important. So I would say okay, so this is gonna definitely, like differentiate us from everyone else. But how long is it going to take how many people we need? What kind of resources do we need? You got to have a very black and white perspective of it and then multiply that by three.

29:29
What is it three come from? Whatever I’m thinking I know it’s gonna be three times harder.

29:35
Three times harder three times the money three times the resources, three times the energy three times the stress because no one no one has done this before I’m sure so you got it. You got to multibyte multi family multi multi

29:49
multiply

29:51
multiply multiply three. All right being Yeah,

29:54
I like it because it’s I think that happens far too often people get a thing getting cost this much. Yeah. It’s only going to be this Yeah. It’s like Oh, man. Yeah, I didn’t think of these 38 things. When I wait for it right. Right in mindful of that is smart is very smart. Yes. So you’ve won a contest recently. It looks like you are in another one as well. Yeah. We’d love to hear all about it.

30:18
So I pitched in founders life. It was my second time pitching. And I won first place. Congrats. Thank you.

30:25
So what is is the whole concept and what was the prize that you want?

30:31
So it was you pitch for you have 99 seconds to pitch. Wow. And you have a slide with it. And I got most of the votes. And what I won was being in Microsoft was startups. Nice. We got as your credits, Microsoft credits. Huge. Yeah. Pr consultation. What else ruin it was like a list.

30:57
That is that is that is huge. Yeah. That’s, that’s awesome.

31:01
Yes. And then lastly, we qualify for the international competition, or the global competition. So

31:08
that’s what you’re in now. Yes. Cool. And then what does that look like?

31:13
Well, where right now is everything is virtual, obviously, because of the pandemic. So right now I’m leading to, to the first place. I’m now in first place. And they’re rushing it, crushing it crushing it, man. Oh, okay. But yeah, it’s gonna end on September 30. So cool, hoping that I come in first place. And then we do the global pitch. And yeah,

31:39
so how do you come in first is just a group of judges that gets to pick is it? There’s a link and people can go Yeah, your pitch and go vote and all that.

31:48
Yes, people can just go to the link and vote. It’s literally everywhere. I posted it everywhere.

31:53
For those that aren’t following you and all that. I mean, it’s and want to check it out. I mean, how can they find the link?

32:00
So just go to my LinkedIn or Instagram, Diana? metiria. Last name is a mouthful, Dianna materia and just search it in my bio. It’s there. And just Yeah, very first link. That’s awesome.

32:15
I definitely gonna go vote. It’s gonna be fun watching you win that. And I mean, it sounds like you already have a lot going on there. But and with the app, what are the big things you’re working on? For you, personally, that you’re trying to accomplish, but also for the business? And maybe the next six months or so?

32:32
I’m looking forward to seeing my family. How long has that been? It’s been 10 years.

32:37
Wow. 10 years? And when are you gonna go see them? And this year? I bet that’s gonna be amazing.

32:44
Yes. The last time they saw me, I was 18.

32:47
Holy cow. How is that? How is that? I mean, how is that better? I mean, let alone you come to a whole new country. Yeah, you know, start something that I mean, a lot of people want to start so they can but you know, get defeated. And yeah, you’ve overcome so many different obstacles. I mean, how good is it gonna feel to go back and show, this is what I’ve come, this is what I’ve just won. And who knows, by that time, you might win the international and then the global pitch con. Like, there’s a lot that your family has to be proud of. I mean, how does that feel to go back and kind of shared memories and

33:19
my brother is definitely looking looking forward to it. He’ll me and him or I think we’re siblings in multiple lives before. Seriously, like, we are so close to a point where I feel what he’s feeling. Wow. Yes, I would. There’s a time I had a dream. He was just walking in, just like tripped. And I call him like everything, okay? And he’s like, yeah, Melvin, his firstborn son burns himself. And like, I’m so sorry. How the heck did I even how, how did that happen? But yeah, we’re very close. He’s looking forward to it. Because we spent literally every day together if we were not in school. So he’s looking forward to it. The rest of my family, they don’t really know what I’m doing. A bunch of cool stuff. Winning contests build naps, right? What is it called? Clean mom? How long have you had it? Six years. Oh, okay. Well, I just want to know how you’re doing. I want this Oh, wow. Congrats. No clue what I’m doing. They have it just goes over there.

34:38
It’s so fun to share it with them. I’m sure you’re proud.

34:40
Yeah. I definitely had have held off from going home because in our culture, we have this thing where we don’t want to come back empty handed. So it’s, it’s like a sign of failure. And so I kind of just held back for a long time and now I can come home and say you know you

34:59
You’re not empty handed? That’s for sure.

35:02
Yeah. So I’m looking forward to just seeing their reaction and just helping them and just, you know, I, I provide for them, and I’m really proud of that. And just being able to come home now and spend some time with them is gonna be a huge thing. I’m gonna I’m looking forward to a lot that shows me lots of smiles, lots of tears, lots of laughter, lots

35:21
of everything.

35:22
Yes, yes. I always pictured just running towards them and just hugging them the airport. I’m looking forward to that. It’s gonna be awesome.

35:31
Yeah, I mean, with all this, like I said, You’ve had so much adversity thrown your way. What keeps me going?

35:42
family, for sure. They keep me going. I think also, just the support I have around keeps me going. Like everyone knows, like, I see something in Dustin. Like, we got to keep helping wherever we can’t. He got to keep going. I see. He’s determined. Like we have to. We have to keep helping out. Whatever it is Dustin, what do you need a haircut? Okay, you’re going to this podcast and we make your hair, you know, yeah, whatever it is, they know that there’s something there. And it’s like a part of me that doesn’t want to disappoint them. Because they’re, that’s the best that they can do. Yeah, knowing that I can go somewhere further. And it’s also going to help not just myself, but my family and the community around me. But it’s amazing. I mean, it’s you do have a great support group. I

36:33
mean, even whenever we helped, you know, record a few things. And just, every time I came around you and your friends and everyone, everyone’s just so helpful, welcome. How can I it’s just, it’s awesome to see and I, I got such a small little glimpse into it. And it’s mean, you got a lot, a lot of support a lot of love going for it, which I think is why you’re, you’re continuing to keep growing and growing no matter what. No matter what curveballs get thrown your way.

36:57
Yeah, for sure. It’s honestly, at the end of the day, it’s not my success, it’s everyone’s

37:02
can instead of better. With that being said, you know, a lot of people are looking to dive into technology create apps for their their business. What’s the one big piece of advice you’d have for any, any person looking to get into tech or any business that goes, You know what? building an app seems like, it’s not that hard. And I can do it, what’s the biggest piece of advice you’d have for someone that’s about to partake on, on diving into the app world, learn, learn, learn and learn a lot, have any good resources on where to

37:33
learn, I would say galvanize is a good place to start galvanize, they have a JavaScript free class. And it’s all online, you do it at your own pace. And JavaScript is like one of the oldest languages that you can do something with it now. So it will just help you understand the fundamentals. So when you pick something else that you really want to learn, you’re like, ah, I get that Bart, I understand what that is. But I would say is learning like, find find your, your niche in technology, because technology is so broad, like when you say that there’s so much

38:13
like, say marketing? I mean, yeah, marketing is so broad is so many things that get under that umbrella.

38:18
Yeah, I would just say just pick something and learn it. And be good at it as much as you can. And always be around the technology community. Because you cannot do it yourself. You’re going to learn something from someone else. And that other person is going to learn something from you. Surprise, surprise you they’re going to learn something from you. Because everyone is just learning everyone is learning. No one is like completely stellar at what they do. So just continue being around those people so you can learn from each other. It’s all it’s all about networking. Get around the people that you know,

38:54
you want to be like that they won’t be like you and yeah, being around like minded people. And yeah, it goes a long way. A long way. This has been so good. Yeah, it’s been fun catching up. awesome to hear you know, the pitch contest. awesome to hear. You know, you’re in the running for the International side of it. I can’t wait to watch you when it can’t wait to continue watching your growth. If anyone if anyone’s looking to, you know, check out the app get in contact with you. How can How can they find you the app, some more information on everything you offer?

39:22
Just go to clean app and cleaner app. And the links are there. Just hit me up. We’ll put you in the application. You’ll test it out. Let us know what you think.

39:32
Cool. Thanks so much for your time. Thank you, Dustin.


Where To Find Diana Muturia

LinkedIn: Diana Muturia

Website: www.clynapp.com

On the previous episode of RGR, Dustin talked to Lacy from WildJoy

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